My review

LAUGHTER YOGA IN PEACE LAB

The digital story ‘Laughter Yoga in Peace Lab.’ Is a documentary examining the life of a Lawyer who founded the ‘Peace Lab’ to coach meditation and yoga to train people to ease stress and tensions in life. To talk about the experience, it was a shocking and funny moment while watching the video. Because it was weird to see people laughing loud, like few on the floor and few standing. Later I realised how stressful and painful their life is.

The person behind the video should have done lots of research regarding content, editing, camera and so on. The shots were very amateur, but I felt a raw feel to the video with made me feel realistic. The most interesting part is video’s target audience is so specific, i.e., people who are interested in stress relief or may be yoga. I couldn’t get much information about the social media campaign to reach the audience. Another thing I wish to talk about is ‘Logo’, to me the meaning of the logo is a single eyed yogi.

THIS IS NOT THE CASE

This is the only video I like technically, they had a perfect camera and editing plans. The black and white,  video’s noise filters and Charlie Chaplin style of approach were my favourite picks in the project. The video was about an overseas student from Asia trying to become a part of new Australian society. However, she alway meets some embarrassing things thanks to the culture difference. The plot was funny and made all of us engaged and laugh in class.

They have made a good step in their social media campaign, they have almost used all the available social media platforms to share their work and reach the maximum audience. Editing was perfect in the video, timely syncing of slow and fast motions made the video more attractive, the piece of music running throughout the video reminded me of old Charlie Chaplin movies.

 

Final stages of ‘MUSICORUM’

Music is the greatest language in the world, people can understand the feeling or mood of the music while listening even though they don’t know the meaning. (Patel 2008) “Is music a universal language or not?”, This is the question to be proved through our reaction video. We should be able to communicate our idea to everyone in the audience equally with our Musicorum project, which is one of our goals to create a real fusion of multicultural idioms, without sacrificing anything. To achieve this idea, we as part of the Musicorum experiment have put together a group of 10 to 15 volunteers who were made to listen to a music track and based on their listening experience, we got them talking to explore if some/most of their answers are similar or different.

During the pre-production stage, my duty was to build a website, design minimal posters and logo. And for production, my duty was to take care of cinematography and sound. We used Sony X200 Videocam, and Zoom HF Lapel mic for the shoot and no additional lights were used. Shooting was smooth and perfectly arranged. But, during the shoot, there was a lot of disturbances from the construction site of Metro Tunnel.  Another Group ‘Melbourne Busking’, had this same issue with the ambience sound as they were shooting on the streets. The mic recorded all the unwanted ambience sounds and made our sound mixing work harder. And another thing we should have changed during the shoot was the background of the frame because there was a poster behind the speaker which will mislead the viewer. And one more mistake we did was about the second angle for the shoot. If we had one more angle for the shoot, I think our edit would have been better. My part in social media campaign was to bring out something catching to attract more followers for the social media pages. So, I came up with the idea of an Instagram template board with ‘Muiscorum’ title. I passed the idea to my team member Emre, he went down the Melbourne streets and asked people to pose for the photo, which in turns made people search for the social media pages.

Post-production was the most challenging part for me because the selection of the exact expressions and answers from the vast collection of footages was not an easy task. I had interviews with fifteen people, and a huge number of questions and answers were to be watched and picked. We planned to make a video with fast and precise cuts. For a better understanding of the viewers, questions were displayed in the bottom of the video, and other popups like country flags and names were also added. The video was a bit over exposed, and skin tone of the participants was messed up. At the point when there are individuals in the shot, life is a great deal more unpredictable; because skin tone is a “memory colour.” So grading and colour correction were done to make it appealing. A cool blue tungsten tone was added to the video. Larry Jordan is a Video Editor who faced a similar issue with setting back the skin tone. He describes it on his blog and how to get rid of it and other problems which can be arisen while colour correction and grading over exposed videos. His suggestions are to add enough mid-tones and shadows to the video. Then to compare colour scheme and editing style of most famous reaction video and notice how colours improve viewers attraction. He also suggests using cool colour tint like, blue, green or violet, and as it allows for easy catching by the eyes. Details from his blog helped me to make the video better without the clutters, and with additional graphical text representation, it became much better in appearance.

Link to Website:

https://cmwpass2.wixsite.com/musicorum

Link to Youtube:

https://youtu.be/I2xI2rw48tA

Link to Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/musicorumm/

Link to Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/musicorumm/

Link to Twitter:

https://twitter.com/musicorum2017

References:

  1. Patel, A. D. (2008). Music, language, and the brain. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  2. Larryjordan.com. (2017). Color Correction: Make People Look Normal | Larry Jordan. [online] Available at: https://larryjordan.com/articles/color-correction-make-people-look-normal/ [Accessed 31 May 2017].
  3. Noamkroll.com. (2017). The Best Order Of Operations For Color Grading & Why It Makes All The Difference. [online] Available at: http://noamkroll.com/the-best-order-of-operations-for-color-grading-why-it-makes-all-the-difference/ [Accessed 31 May 2017].

 

 

The Power of Social Media for Nonprofit Organisations

A few years ago, Social Media was an evolving technology praised more for its technical virtues than its capability to request to the people. For a log time, there was a significant change in the way masses participate in social media and make use of it to humanise the interactions between organisations and the community. When the use of social networking websites began to increase rapidly, businesses took notice. Those shrewd companies realised about reaching out to people in social media gave them the opportunity to cast a broad net in the target route.

For instance, companies could place ads targeted towards women in popular fashion blogs and gaining thousands of their attention per day. The change happened when businesses or corporations recognised the key to success lay in interaction, for example, giving target people the ability to have a two-way conversation. Moreover, this is not long before non-profit organisations followed suit.

To get the most benefit from adding social media to our marketing plan, it should be a part of the complete business strategy. All the applied tactics must directly support the organisation’s objectives and goals. As there are so many social media platforms available, which platform and tactics are most applicable? The answer depends on:

  1. The time we have to devote to social media each week?
  2. What will be the main objectives and goals?
  3. How do this social media help to meet the goals?
  4. Which are platform audience engaged more?

Here are the most popular websites and tools:

  1. FACEBOOK helps in communicating softer news and helps in building community.
  2. TWITTER contributes to getting connected to followers by sending updates which are timely and exciting.
  3. FLICKR helps in managing photos and graphic images while sharing with the target. (Photos of events and activities for Non-profits)
  4. LINKEDIN contributes to getting introduced to and collaborate with professionals.
  5. YOUTUBE helps in uploading and sharing video clips to the public.
  6. BLOGS contributes to exchange ideas in greater depth and lets us share tips and expertise related to the goal.
  7. PODCASTS helps in educating the audience with recorded news and information framed by current events data about the organisation.

Other than creating social media campaign, non-profits should participate in other groups in the social media like commenting on blogs, join on FB fan pages.

The non-profits should try to incorporate a mix of messaging objectives targeted towards users in social media. Proper brand awareness helps in engaging in social media and keep our organisation at the forefront of the user’s minds. We should ensure each of the platforms is clearly branded. Branding contributes to reinforcing who the non-profit is and what it stands for.  Education or provide the information to the users about the issues our organisation addresses. Eg, share news links or case studies. Social media is a great tool for mobilising groups of people to volunteer or attend events. The helps in the times of disasters and war. In 2009, a worldwide Twitter event named “Twestival” launched in Uganda, Ethiopia and India. The goal of this event was to provide clean drinking water, and as a result, the event raised a fund more than $250,00 US dollar.

References:

MOTION CAPTURE SENSOR SYSTEMS

Motion Capture is also known as Motion Tracking, or Mocap for short is 3D Animation. Motion Capture is a process in which recordings of human movement are translated into a digital code by filming sensors or every pivot point on characters body. One the video is captured it is then translated onto a 3D Model. (Oxford Dictionary, 2017)

Motion Capture technology has developed significantly since 1970. Performance capture is the term referred to when Motion tracking animates small features like figures, expressions and facial gestures. To portray, all this features more sensors hast to be used, and this makes motion capture process time-consuming. For example, the movie “Avatar” took 15 years to create. The whole purpose of this film was to record the performance of the characters and translate it into digital form.

avatar_mocap_1.png

avatar_mocap1.png

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Here I am embedding a behind the scene video of the famous movie “Avatar”, which I found while researching Motion Capture.

Mechanical Motion Capture:

product_mocaptrack_animazoo_gypsy5_2.jpg

This Motion Capture is a process by which the actors wear structured skeleton suit called as an exoskeleton capture system to track human joints and angles. This capturing system is the popular type of Performance capture and this because of the lowest price and availability in the field.

Electromagnetic Motion Capture:

gollum.gif

This is the most specific type of the movement capture system relying on transmitters and receivers to track the body movement. An actor would wear a suit with several magnetic receivers in which transmitters would monitor and calculate body movements.  The 20th-century Fox movie ‘The Lord of Rings’  used this technology for one of the lead roles of the creature “Gollum”.

Optical Motion Capture:

lo_lorna_mocap.jpg

Optical Motion Capture system requires actors to wear reflective sensors over a tight Motion capture suit or their own clothes if they wish. The actor is asked to act while several cameras track the reflective pads. When cameras have the desired number of footage, it is then shared each other and translated to digital form.

History:

The system for capturing motion was first developed in the late 70’s, however, it was not recognised as a revolutionary animation technique till mid 80’s when it was eventually used for entertainment purpose. Inspired by Rotoscoping or Rotoscopy an ancient time-consuming technique was developed from early 90’s in which the animator will trace the movement frame by frame. Motion capturing technique was originally tested by the air force to track head movements of the fighter pilots by electromagnetic motion capture.

Below is the typical Rotoscope invented by Max and Dave Fleischer animators from 90’s who used rotoscoping infamous cartoons such as Betty Boop and Gullivers Travels.

rotoscope

 Where is Performance capture or Motion Capture used?

Nowadays motion capture serves a broad range of purposes like pilot’s head movement tracking in the military, tracking of athletes in sports, determining injuries and how to treat them in medical applications, building human-like characters in animation, cartoon, games and films for entertainment and advertisement purpose.

For example, motion capture is used by worldwide car manufacturer Ford to help in developing a better product. Ford is the only company uses the same Motion capture software in its virtual engineering laps as Hollywood to create such motion pictures as Lord of Rings, Avatar and Polar Express.

“Like in Hollywood movies, Ford hooks people with sensors to monitor how they move or react when they are interacting with the machines,” said Gary Strumolo, manager, Ford research and engineering. “Once we capture the motion, we create virtual human models that can use to run hundreds of tests that helps in understanding how people of all sizes and shapes interact with all vehicle designs. This is an efficient way of tomorrow’s engineering vehicles.” (Company, F 2017).

References:

  1. Company, F. (2017). Ford Uses Hollywood Motion-Capture Software Behind ‘Avatar’ to Improve Vehicle Designs. [online] Prnewswire.com. Available at: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/ford-uses-hollywood-motion-capture-software-behind-avatar-to-improve-vehicle-designs-79912032.html [Accessed 11 May 2017].

  2. AZoSensors.com. (2012). Motion Capture Sensor Systems. [online] Available at: http://www.azosensors.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=43 [Accessed 11 May 2017].

  3. The Hollywood Reporter. (2017). ‘Avatar’ house is motion-capture Giant. [online] Available at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/avatar-house-is-motion-capture-86549 [Accessed 11 May 2017].

  4. Coldewey, D. (2014). Interview: Reuben Langdon, motion capture artist for Avatar. [online] TechCrunch. Available at: https://techcrunch.com/2009/06/23/interview-reuben-langdon-motion-capture-artist-for-avatar/ [Accessed 12 May 2017].

  5. Hand, R. and Hand, R. (2009). The Art of Motion Capture in Avatar |. [online] VizWorld.com. Available at: https://vizworld.com/2009/12/art-motion-capture-avatar/ [Accessed 12 May 2017].

  6. Sagar Lonkar. (2014). Types Of Motion Capture. [online] Available at: https://sagarlonkar.com/about-2/motion-capture/types-of-motion-capture/ [Accessed 12 May 2017].

  7. Ranga (2013). Motion capture technology. [online] Slideshare.net. Available at: https://www.slideshare.net/anveshranga/motion-capture-technology-15980853 [Accessed 11 May 2017].